Nov 2, 2017 in History

What was the Stamp Act?

An act of the Great Britain’s Parliament passed in 1965, called the Stamp Act required the American colonies to purchase tax stamps for almost all of the actions: getting commercial and legal documents, newspapers etc. (Faragher et al. 143). Americans protested the new expenses they had to pay for costing the British coffers after the devastation caused by the Seven Years’ War (Faragher et al. 144). Moreover, the American protest was entailed by the fact that they had no representatives in the British parliament. Therefore, the long-term constitutional implications and inability to influence them became another concern of the colonists. After numerous resolutions denouncing the Stamp Act and further violent protests, the British government has finally repealed the Act.

What was the Boston Massacre?

The British governing including the taxes duty and neglecting the needs of the inhabitants of the American colonies has lead to hostile disposition of the colonists against the British. Hence the troops stationed on the territory of the colonies became a source of scorn and hostility (Faragher et al. 149). In March of 1770, a confrontation between the peaceful crowd of colonists and British soldiers has aroused and resulted in five deaths (Faragher et al. 149). This event was called Boston Massacre and has lead to a temporary digression of both sides.

How was an American Identity Formed?

The identity of the American colonists was formed along with their realization of the fact that the British government was functioning on behalf of the British Empire prosperity and paid considerably less attention to the interests of the colonies in North America than to their own. Such orientation of the British Parliament and inability of the American colonists to affect their level of life has entailed the hostility towards the British representatives. Moreover, this caused the oppression of the moral state of the colonist, who ceased feeling their affiliation to the British nation.

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